There’s no doubt about it—dementia care is expensive. And, the cost of memory care varies state by state, which can muddle the waters and make it hard to know how much it actually costs. This post will help with that.

We’re going to help you determine what memory care costs in your state and how to find reputable memory care providers for your loved ones with dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease so that they can live their best life possible.

memory care cost

You Get What You Pay For: What’s Included in Dementia Care?

The cost of dementia care can be very high due to these patients’ specialized care and attention. Dementia care includes memory care activities, memory games, and socialization opportunities to help with memory stabilization.

It also means caregivers or nurses feed, bathe, dress, and assist with daily tasks every day with these patients. It’s a full-time, round-the-clock job in some instances and also requires therapies, advanced health care management, and more depending on the progression of the disease.

An essential part of being a qualified memory care provider is training for the caregiver. A dementia caregivers’ role can be demanding; this training helps keep them up-to-date on how best to handle challenging behaviors that sometimes come about due to the disease.

Female doctor showing geometric shape game to elderly female patient with dementia

Different Types of Dementia Care Explained

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all type of care for dementia patients. There are many different versions of care that can be given depending on whether a person is in a nursing home, assisted, living, living independently, or wants to age in place at home. Each type of care comes with its own benefits and downfalls—and price tag.

Home Health Aide

This type of memory care is perfect for patients who still live independently but need assistance with daily tasks. They can be given around-the-clock memory care at home, including medications and other medical management if needed. The caregiver will also help them maintain their homes so that they don’t have to worry about putting off house chores like laundry, cooking, or cleaning.

This is an excellent option for those whose progress may be derailed by moving them into a nursing home or assisted living. This method may also be a way for family caregivers to be more involved and get the assistance they need to maintain a good quality of life.

Assisted Living

Assisted living facilities still give patients a sense of independence, and they often live in an apartment or shared room, but with the assistance they need from trained nurses and aides.  This memory care option is a good one for those who might be scared of being in a nursing home or may not need the intensive memory care that’s needed with round-the-clock care.

These patients have access to daily activities, memory care, socialization with other residents, and more, depending on their needs. In addition to memory care, assisted living facilities often provide basic health services, like medication management, physical therapy, and help with bathing, dressing, and grooming.

Assisted Living communities also offer Memory Care Units (which are secured units located within the assisted living community). Our buildings offer these. This allows individuals to get the benefits of community living and activities but still have a safe and secure location with no risk of wandering.

Semi-Private Nursing Home Room

A semi-private nursing home room is more like a hospital room where two patients would share a room with a cloth draped to separate the sides. This is for patients who are bedridden and require more advanced levels of care and attention.

A semi-private nursing home works best for those who need 24-hour memory care on top of complete assistance with day-to-day tasks. It is also a little more affordable than an assisted living or nursing home facility that offers a private room with one resident.

Private Nursing Home

If your loved one has dementia-related anxiety, it can be complicated to have them in a room with another patient. That’s where a private nursing home room can help. The privacy helps make them feel more comfortable and may even be more comfortable for family or caregivers who come to spend time with their loved ones in their room. 

This memory care option is best for those who need around-the-clock nursing care and don’t mind paying the higher price tag that comes with it. Private nursing home rooms also come with more amenities, like personal TVs, radios, and phones in each room.

Adult Daycare

Adult daycare is a great memory care option for those who have early-onset dementia and don’t need full-time assistance but can’t be left alone during the day. This type of memory care offers socialization, activities, and meals in a safe and supervised environment.

As you can see, the types of medical and memory care vary greatly depending on the levels of care needed for an individual with dementia. These prices also swing high or low depending on where you live—which we’ll get into next.

Closeup of senior lady's hands holding a walker and helpful nurse supporting her

How Much Does Dementia Care Cost per State?

The Genworth Cost of Care Survey was one of the most extensive and thorough studies about costs of care across the world. This survey helped develop an accurate estimate of dementia care costs across all methods, types, and locations. So if you’re in a position to find memory care for yourself or a loved one, this data will come in incredibly helpful.

The Cost of Dementia Care in Each State (per month)

State

Home Health Aide

Adult Daycare

Assisted Living

Semi-Private Nursing Home

Private Nursing Home

Alabama

$3,200

$600

$3,000

$6,000

$6,500

Alaska

$5,200

$3,600

$6,000

$24,000

$24,000

Arizona

$4,300

$1,700

$3,500

$6,300

$7,600

Arkansas

$3,400

$1,700

$3,000

$5,100

$5,800

California

$4,700

$1,700

$4,300

$8,100

$9,700

Colorado

$4,600

$1,500

$3,900

$7,700

$8,500

Connecticut

$4,400

$1,700

$4,600

$12,500

$13,500

Delaware

$4,200

$1,600

$6,000

$10,600

$11,000

Florida

$3,800

$1,400

$3,100

$7,900

$8,900

Georgia

$3,600

$1,300

$2,800

$6,200

$6,700

Hawaii

$4,900

$1,500

$4,250

$11,400

$13,200

Idaho

$4,100

$2,200

$3,150

$7,400

$7,900

Illinois

$4,300

$1,500

$3,700

$5,700

$6,500

Indiana

$4,000

$1,800

$4,025

$6,700

$7,800

Iowa

$4,500

$1,400

$3,700

$5,700

$6,200

Kansas

$4,000

$1,600

$4,250

$5,550

$6,200

Kentucky

$3,700

$1,400

$3,400

$6,700

$7,300

Louisiana

$2,900

$1,350

$3,300

$5,100

$5,500

Maine,

$4,400

$2,300

$4,900

$9,100

$9,700

Maryland

$4,400

$1,700

$4,100

$9,100

$9,900

Massachusetts

$4,950

$1,400

$5,600

$11,700

$12,400

Michigan

$4,100

$1,700

$3,500

$8,000

$8,600

Minnesota

$5,100

$1,800

$3,500

$8,100

$9,000

Mississippi

$3,400

$975

$3,300

$6,500

$6,600

Missouri

$4,000

$1,700

$2,700

$4,900

$5,500

Montana

$4,600

$2,500

$3,650

$7,200

$7,900

Nebraska

$4,600

$1,600

$3,700

$6,000

$6,800

Nevada

$4,200

$1,600

$3,400

$7,300

$8,300

New Hampshire

$5,000

$1,500

$4,800

$9,600

$10,500

New Jersey

$4,400

$1,950

$5,800

$10,000

$10,800

New Mexico

$3,900

$2,200

$4,000

$6,300

$7,400

New York

$4,500

$3,900

$3,900

$11,000

$11,700

North Carolina

$3,500

$1,150

$3,250

$6,800

$7,600

North Dakota

$5,300

$2,100

$3,000

$10,600

$10,900

Ohio

$4,000

$1,200

$4,200

$6,800

$7,600

Oklahoma

$4,000

$1,300

$3,000

$4,500

$5,300

Oregon

$4,700

$1,900

$4,000

$8,780

$9,200

Pennsylvania

$4,200

$1,300

$3,400

$9,300

$10,000

Rhode Island

$4,800

$1,600

$5,100

$8,500

$8,700

South Carolina

$3,800

$1,200

$2,900

$6,400

$6,900

South Dakota

$4,800

$1,500

$3,500

$6,300

$6,800

Tennessee

$3,575

$1,400

$3,600

$6,100

$6,600

Texas

$3,800

$750

$3,500

$4,500

$6,050

Utah

$4,300

$1,400

$4,200

$5,600

$7,000

Vermont

$4,800

$2,900

$4,100

$8,800

$9,300

Virginia

$4,000

$1,500

$4,500

$7,150

$7,900

Washington

$5,000

$1,400

$4,700

$8,600

$9,500

West Virginia

$3,400

$1,300

$3,750

$9,700

$10,200

Wisconsin

$4,500

$1,400

$4,000

$7,900

$8,900

Wyoming

$5,150

$1,800

$3,400

$7,000

$8,000

 

Paying for Dementia Care can be a massive expense, but there are ways you can get assistance paying for it. You or your loved ones can use insurance, take out a home equity loan, apply for state funding through an elderly or CADI waiver, or eventually get Medicaid coverage. 

Before going into Dementia care, it’s important to know both the cost and what is included in that cost. For many, the added memory care and attention from nursing staff is vital to the care and treatment of a person with dementia and is worth the cost. 

If you are interested in looking at options for Dementia and memory care—reach out to Sunflower Communities. Our friendly and well-trained staff can help walk you through the process. 

We can discuss pricing, payment options, and we do accept elderly and brain injury waivers which can help offset the cost of many memory care services we offer.